Do you REALLY know what is in your vitamins?

Do you REALLY know what is in your vitamins?

Whole-Food Vitamins

Whole Food Vitamins Nutrigold

If the vitamins and/or minerals in the product -

  1. are from raw materials that DO occur in nature (e.g. algae, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices)

  2. are from raw materials that are known to be naturally rich in those vitamins / minerals

  3. are from raw materials that are NOT genetically modified

  4. are from raw materials that do NOT include petroleum by-products or other industrial chemicals and solvents

  5. are full-spectrum concentrated to contain the naturally-occurring vitamins and minerals along with co-factors and other bioactive compounds

  6. are in a form that is highly bioavailable and the body recognizes as food

Note: Regardless of whether or not the product contains other ingredients (e.g. herbs, herbal extracts, fruit powders, vegetable powders, enzymes, probiotics, green powders), it must be considered a whole-food multivitamin product for the purposes of labeling and marketing.

Acceptable terms to describe the multivitamin product: Whole-food Multivitamin, Whole-food Multivitamin / Multimineral, Food-sourced, Food-based

Acceptable, but NOT recommended terms to describe the multivitamin product: Natural (because there is currently no universally accepted definition of natural), Food-created / Food-grown (because these are made-up words that have no formal definition).

 

Food-Sourced Vitamins

Food Sourced VitaminsIf the vitamins and/or minerals in the product -

  1. are from raw materials that DO occur in nature (e.g. algae, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices)
  2. are from raw materials that are known to be naturally rich in those vitamins / minerals
  3. are from raw materials that are NOT genetically modified
  4. are from raw materials that do NOT include petroleum by-products or other industrial chemicals and solvents
  5. are standardized to contain the naturally-occurring vitamins and minerals in a form that the body recognizes as food
  6. may contain some of the naturally-occurring co-factors

Note: Regardless of whether or not the product contains other ingredients (e.g. herbs, herbal extracts, fruit powders, vegetable powders, enzymes, probiotics, green powders), it must be considered a food-sourced multivitamin product for the purposes of labeling and marketing.

Acceptable terms to describe the multivitamin product: Multivitamin, Multimineral, Food-sourced, Food-based

Acceptable, but NOT recommended terms to describe the multivitamin product: Natural (because there is currently no universally accepted definition of natural), Food-created / Food-grown (because these are made-up words that have no formal definition).

 

Cultured Vitamins

Cultured VitaminsIf the vitamins and/or minerals in the product -

  1. are from raw materials that do NOT occur in nature
  2. are from raw materials that are NOT known to be naturally rich in those vitamins / minerals
  3. are from raw materials that may be genetically modified
  4. are synthesized from petroleum by-products or other industrial chemicals and solvents
  5. are cultured / grown in yeast and/or probiotic media along with other co-nutrients
  6. may have “co-factors” or “co-nutrients” that are “synthetic” “added” and cultured with the vitamins and minerals; in other words, co-factors are NOT naturally-occurring

Note: Even if the product contains other ingredients (e.g. herbs, herbal extracts, fruit powders, vegetable powders, enzymes, probiotics, green powders), it must be considered a cultured multivitamin product for the purposes of labeling and marketing.

Acceptable terms to describe the multivitamin product: Multivitamin, Multimineral, Cultured, Co-enzymated (if the appropriate co-factors are present)

Unacceptable terms to describe the multivitamin product: Natural, Food-based, Food-sourced, Food-created, Food-grown, Whole-food, or any combination thereof. In fact, companies must NOT use any terms that have the potential to imply to the consumer that the vitamins and/or minerals in the product are derived from raw materials that occur in nature or that they are in a form that the body will readily recognize as food.

 

Synthetic Vitamins

Synthetic Vitamins If the vitamins and/or minerals in the product -

  1. are from raw materials that do NOT occur in nature
  2. are from raw materials that are NOT known to be naturally rich in those vitamins / minerals
  3. are from raw materials that may be genetically modified
  4. are synthesized from petroleum by-products or other industrial chemicals and solvents
  5. are in synthetic, isolated, fractionated form
  6. are with or without co-factors; when co-factors are present, they are also in synthetic form

Note: Even if the product contains other ingredients (e.g. herbs, herbal extracts, fruit powders, vegetable powders, enzymes, probiotics, green powders), it must be considered a synthetic multivitamin product for the purposes of labeling and marketing.

Acceptable terms to describe the multivitamin product: Multivitamin, Multimineral, Co-enzymated, Chelated

Unacceptable terms to describe the multivitamin product: Natural, Food-based, Food-sourced, Food-created, Food-grown, Whole-food, or any combination thereof. In fact, companies may NOT use any terms that have the potential to imply to the consumer that the vitamins and/or minerals in the product are derived from raw materials that occur in nature or that they are in a form that the body will readily recognize as food.

 

Source:   http://www.nutrigold.com/guide-to-multivitamins/

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